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Mid-Wood Inc. Agronomy News

End of June Lookouts

BE MINDFUL OF CALENDAR DATE WITH FOMESAFEN USAGE

With the prevalence of glyphosate-resistant waterhemp across most of our region, we have very few herbicide options for management in our soybeans.  The PPO-inhibiting (group 14) herbicides are what we have been relying on for the last several years to obtain adequate control of this hard to control pigweed species.  Soon, these options will be even more limited.

IMPLICATIONS OF EARLY CORN WILTING

Although a recent storm pattern has doused many areas, localized hot, dry weather has resulted in some cornfields experiencing daytime leaf rolling or wilting.  As long as the corn returns to its normal appearance when air temperatures go down in the evening, there should be little lasting harm.  This does suggest, however, that a review may be in order of what to look for when evaluating the impact of hot, dry weather on the corn crop.

COMMON RUST IDENTIFICATION & MANAGEMENT IN CORN

A number of individuals have reported that common rust is a very-easily-found corn foliar disease at this time.  Observations suggest that the rust infections are not currently at threatening levels in most fields.  How can common rust of corn be identified?  Is common rust of corn the same pathogen as leaf rust in wheat?  What is the advisability of treating for common rust with fungicides?

SAP-FEEDING PESTS MAY BENEFIT FROM HOT WEATHER

During hot, dry weather, the composition of plant sap often changes.  Amino acid concentration may go up, along with sugars, as water content goes down.  This can be of benefit to certain sap-feeding pests in field crops.  Increased amino acid content of plant sap is especially important for most of these pests.  The pests which most often benefit under these conditions include mites, aphids, leafhoppers, thrips and whiteflies.

STORM-LODGED CORN RECOVERY POTENTIAL

Recent storms have toppled corn in a number of fields.  Damage varies from slightly leaning to completely flattened.  Since we are now several days past the storms, some recovery of this lodged corn should now be noted.  How much recovery can be expected over time and what is the likely impact on yield?

EVALUATION OF HAIL DAMAGE IN CORN & SOYBEANS

          - Hail adjusters use tables to help evaluate extent of hail damage.  (With insured crops, hail adjusters have the final word.  It is best to let them do their job before offering another opinion.

          - Wait 7-10 days to assess hail damage to corn and soybeans.

          - Most hail damage to soybeans is as a result of loss of plants to the stand.  Soybean populations, as low as 75,000 plants per acre, may be worth saving.

          - Bruising and freeze injury may cause delayed damage to soybeans.

          - Fungicides have questionable benefit with hail damage.  Applications should be delayed until leaf tissue regrows.

FAA Releases Small Unmanned Aircraft Regulations (Part 107)

The Federal Aviation Administration has released the long awaited regulation for sUAS (small unmanned aircraft systems). See below for highlights of the new regulation as well as an attached link to the FAA website and fact sheet that will help to answer any additional questions you may have.  Please understand that the part 107 regulations will not take effect until late August, 2016 and all previous rules regarding commercial UAS flights are still current until the notice of the final release date.

Note: Click on the title link for full article.